Health Care

Dissecting The SC Workers’ Compensation System

Dissecting The SC Workers’ Compensation System

Dissecting The SC Workers’ Compensation System

People go to work every day without really thinking much about on-the-job injuries. Even workers who find themselves in precarious situations day in and day out can become lax in their thinking when it comes to getting hurt on the job. But accidents do happen. When they happen at someone’s workplace, it’s comforting to know that lost wages, medical bills, and more, will be covered by workers’ compensation.

 What Is the SC Worker’s Compensation System?

Let’s say you get hurt on the job. If you are unacquainted with the complex Worker’s Compensation Laws in South Carolina, in order to get benefits approved, you may find yourself struggling. You may even suffer some type of retaliation from your company or your boss.

You know that your bills aren’t going to get paid after an injury if you have no income. Frustration will further ensue because your family may not be able to eat, and more. This is unacceptable. That’s why the workers’ compensation system is in place – to protect the rights of an injured employee.

Let’s take a closer look at this system so that you can have a better understanding of how it works. In this manner, you will be better prepared should the worst come to fruition.

Remember, it’s always a good idea to have a legal representative on your side if you were injured at work or become ill as a result of work conditions.

Understanding The SC Workers Compensation System

Worker eligibility must be determined – To be cash and medical benefit-eligible, you must work for a company that classifies you as an employee and become injured on the job or ill as a result of working conditions. The following employees or groups may be ineligible:

  • Certain casual or temporary employee classes
  • Agricultural workers
  • Businesses that are small (i.e., four employees or less)
  • Most South Carolina federal workers
  • Railroad and Railway Company workers
  • Certain real estate worker classifications

Appealing decisions and/or filing claims – Initial claims must be reported in a timely manner. First, your employer has a time limit within which you must report any injury or illness. Secondly, a claim must be officially filed for workers’ compensation, also in a timely manner. Forms can be filed electronically in most cases.

It is only up to the injured employee to file a workers’ compensation claim if the injury or illness has not been reported by the employer, or if the claim is denied by the insurer.

If the injured worker disagrees with the Single Commissioner’s decision and order, a form must be filed within 14 days of service of the decision and order, and along with a filing fee, unless the commission allows the fee to be waived.

After benefit approval – There is a standard maximum weekly benefit in place put forth by the South Carolina government. What is not specified, however, is how long the insured person can continue to receive payment. The worker is entitled to medical coverage and a certain percentage of their gross weekly salary. Because these things change on a semi regular basis, check online or with your legal representative for the current standards and percentages.

Why Should You Hire Cardinal Law Partners to Assist With Your Workers’ Comp Case?

In any workers’ compensation case, you want an advocate fighting for your rights who is experienced. Our legal team consists of experienced, competent, and committed attorneys and staff members. You can sleep better at night knowing that the professionals from Cardinal Law Partners are on your side.

If you or a loved one is currently dealing with a workers’ compensation case, contact Cardinal Law Partners now to schedule a free consultation with our workers’ compensation attorneys today.